Mad Max: Fury Road

We are not things

Mad Max Fury Road - Charlize Theron As Imperator Furiosa WallpaperI am thankful that a forty year-old disabled woman can be the main character of an action movie.  I am thankful that George Miller can not only combat the macho, faux-masculine baloney that constitutes so many action movies these days, but that he can also still create superior action scenes whilst making this point.  I am thankful that a group of warrior women of all ages can make up the ragtag band of revolutionaries that sit at the core of any proper dystopia.  I am thankful that the women who play the prisoners can be three-dimensional people with dreams, personalities, badass names, and agency, not just helpless pregnant damsels.  I am thankful that more than one woman can make it out of an action film alive, and that “Vasquez” doesn’t always die.  I am thankful that a woman and a man can share top billing in a brutal, action-packed setpiece without ever once kissing each other or musing about running away as a couple.  I am thankful that the creator of one of the most lucrative and culty “man movie” franchises of all time would consult the writer of The Vagina Monologues to look over his new script.  I am thankful for that scene wherein Max (Tom Hardy) screws up two difficult shots and needs Furiosa (Charlize Theron) to snipe a difficult target.  I am thankful for the name “Max Rockatansky” and the opening credits that feature only two names.  I am thankful that Miller and Nicholas Hoult can turn a sociopathic mook into a sympathetic character in under an hour.  I am thankful that Hugh Keays-Byrne still acts, and that the same actor can play different characters in films by the same director, a la Leone’s spaghetti westerns and grindhouse fare of every stripe.  I am thankful that the MPAA no longer takes issue with the fact that a female character “fights back.”  I am thankful that a movie like this did not deafen me; in fact, I wanted to listen.

Furiosa.  Forever.

Mad Max: Fury Road (2015); written by George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, and Nico Lathouris; directed by George Miller; starring Charlize Theron, Tom Hardy, Nicholas Hoult.   

Pompeii

A new way of looking at Carbonite

pompeii-movie-still-13There’s not much reason to write about Pompeii.  It’s a formula action movie, and its plot is a facsimile of Gladiator (which is itself derivative enough).  Its dialogue is laconic, unoriginal, and plot-driven, and the cast is an ensemble of stock characters.  But I’m interested in Mount Vesuvius, particularly the eruption that wiped out an entire population of people who had no idea what was happening, and whom we know almost nothing about.  I’m interested in the imagining of who those people could have been, an impetus for filmmaking that seems extremely genuine on director Paul W.S. Anderson’s part.

Milo (Kit Harington), also known as “the Celt,” is the sole survivor of a tribe of horsemen needlessly slaughtered by those damned Romans, led by Senator Corvus (Kiefer Sutherland).  Milo is now everyone’s favorite gladiator, which means that the politicians hate him.  He shares the main narrative with Cassia (Emily Browning), Pompeii’s equivalent of a princess, who is a bit more vocal about her contempt for Rome than her reticent parents (played by Carrie-Anne Moss and Jared Harris) are.  Corvus comes to Pompeii under the pretense of helping improve the conditions of the city, when he really wants to marry Cassia, even threatening to have her parents killed for treason when she refuses.  What must happen from here?  Cassia and Milo must become drawn to one another.  Corvus must antagonize Milo, but not recognize him until a pivotal moment.  Milo must cause a scene in the Amphitheater that gets everyone talking, and then lead the remaining gladiators (which includes champion Atticus, played by Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje) to freedom.  The slave must defeat the corrupt politician, and the forbidden love must be allowed to bloom.  You know the formula.  Hopefully you’re tired of it, and not as hopelessly addicted to it as are so many seekers of casual entertainment, who can barely stomach the thought of real characterization (read: they don’t know what it is).

But the most interesting character is Mount Vesuvius itself, a plot device that not all other action period pieces have.  It’s fascinating to see the reactions of Pompeii’s citizens, most of whom think their Gods are punishing them for violating one silly tenet or another.  This is where the film’s characters are really defined: how they behave when an active volcano is about to devour their entire world.  Cassia, Atticus, and Milo want to evacuate as many people as possible; Ariadne (Jessica Lucas), Cassia’s servant and friend, wants to stay by Cassia’s side instead of saving herself (which yields results you can guess at); Graecus the slaveowner (Joe Pingue) wants to get out of town without a second thought for anyone else; and best of all, Corvus, along with his right-hand man Proculus (Sasha Roiz), is just petty enough to stay in a doomed, collapsing city to settle a score with Milo, even though no one’s ever going to know about it.

I can’t help but like Kit Harington, with all of his pouty brooding.  What unfortunate situations his characters find themselves in.  What loss they experience.  Emily Browning is another find.  There’s a lead actress there, and one who’s able to play tender drama and badass heroism together.  I want these two to win, even when the film’s poster essentially shows them about to die.  On the other hand, Carrie-Anne Moss, once a leading action hero herself, hard-bodied and kicking butt and doing it with Matrix-era Keanu Reeves in an elevator, is relegated to the role of the ill-fated mother (her voice role as Aria T’Loak in the Mass Effect games is a revelation; why are filmmakers forgetting that she was Trinity?).  Akinnuoye-Agbaje still plays the aloof tough guy with a code, and does considerable justice to whom his character may have been.  Sutherland phones it in, and as monstrous as his character is supposed to be, he’s nothing compared to Eva Green’s deliciously evil warrior-woman in the otherwise mediocre 300 sequel earlier this year (a film whose anachronisms and embellishments make Pompeii look like a documentary).

The film is worthwhile if you know a little bit of the history.  Anderson’s stimulus is an image of two real-life people, discovered in the excavation of Pompeii, who were entombed in the mountain’s pyroclastic flows, creating casts of their exact body shapes when they died.  The casts were later filled with plaster to create the now-famous molds of people in their final poses.  It’s romantic to think that these two may have been heroic lovers and not simply citizens holding each other in shared terror, but these people (along with another cast of a man believed to be from North Africa) inform the film’s characters, and how fantastic it is to think that these people can be immortalized this way.  Even if we’re just making up stuff about them and using their made-up story to satisfy adolescent boys on a weekend, maybe more people will become interested in the historical narrative.

Pompeii (2014); written by Janet Scott Batchler, Lee Batchler, and Michael Robert Johnson; directed by Paul W.S. Anderson; starring Kit Harington, Emily Browning, Jessica Lucas, and Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje.

 

 

 

Taken 2

What I do best

One or two good action pictures make it to the top of the pile each year.  Only once or twice a century, however, does a film sequel outshine its predecessor, especially when the original idea was as thin as a film like Taken.  Don’t be mistaken: the idea is still “any excuse for Liam Neeson to beat up non-Americans” (despite the fact that Neeson himself is Irish), but Taken 2 is better than the original for two reasons: it gives Neeson’s character an emotion or two, and it makes better use of its supporting cast.  The secret?  Acknowledging that they’re people.  Even if they hopelessly revolve around a male action hero, it’s nice that they seem important to him, and Taken 2 focuses more on the theme of fatherhood and responsibility (even if it does so mostly with action) than the first film, which only sought to find new ways of piling bodies as quickly as possible.

The story follows Bryan Mills (Neeson) and his daughter, Kim (Maggie Grace) as they try to resume their lives after the events of the first film, in which Mills saved Kim from a ragtag group of Albanian criminals and sex traffickers.  The biggest conflict in Mills’ life is now whether he can train Kim to ace her driver’s test.  He’s also spending more time with his ex-wife, Lenore (Famke Janssen), whose new boyfriend happens to be a Spiteful Sleaze.  Before the charming family scenes, though, we witness Murad (Rade Šerbedžija), father of Marko, a goon who met a particularly unsettling demise at Mills’ hands in the first film, making plans with his own goons to take revenge upon Mills.  Considering the fact that Mills killed this man’s son in order to save his daughter, I think there must be a circular logic meme in there somewhere.  Long story short, Murad’s men kidnap not Kim, but (surprise!) Mills and Lenore, who are just beginning to reconcile their relationship.

This is where it gets good: in a very nice role reversal, teenaged Kim must save her parents from the bad guys.  It doesn’t happen instantly, either.  A lot of time is spent alone with Kim, who takes some direction from her father over the phone and improvises the rest.  It takes some suspension of disbelief concerning law enforcement and witnesses, considering a few of the things Kim does might render her an international terrorist in real life, but it’s wonderful to see her evolve into a breathing organism as opposed to the cardboard “teenage girl” stock character she played in the original.  And of course, Maggie Grace, who shone as Shannon on TV’s Lost, is second-to-none when it comes to crying convincingly on screen.  Best of all, she gets to play a person with real concerns and genuine bravery – and she gets to do most of it while fully clothed!

Once freed from prison, Mills teams with Kim to rescue Lenore, who is still in the clutches of Murad and his dedicated team of bloodthirsty fighting machines.  The film then becomes a somewhat formulaic two-way cat-and-mouse game between Murad and Mills, who must fight his way through legions of enemies before he, Murad, Kim, and Lenore are the only remaining players.  Refreshingly, Murad’s henchmen are in limited supply, and it’s pretty easy to keep track of roughly how many he has left because the same faces repeatedly show up throughout the chase.  Additionally, it’s easy to sympathize with the mostly one-note Murad, thanks to Šerbedžija’s dependably dedicated acting: he lost his son; why wouldn’t he want some resolution?  But he makes one too many villainous decisions to escape this film alive.  On the other hand, his followers are viciously devoted to torturing and killing Mills.  Marko (Murad’s son) must really have been the toast of Albania for these guys to be so convicted.

Like this year’s The Bourne Legacy, Taken 2 opens the possibility of a sequel, but does not promise, require, or guarantee it.  It’s a good action film with some subtlety and a fair attempt at character.  While it does include the unfortunate trope of non-American villains who could be any race to an American audience (just look at Šerbedžija, a Serbian actor who constantly plays Russian and Bulgarian characters), it doesn’t involve the obligatory sexual objectification of white women that was heavily featured in the original Taken, nor is Mills as much of a ruthless brute as he once was.  Nearly every bad vibe is gone, stripping the film down to a likeable action flick wisely contained in its own drama.  It’s not the highest film art of the year, but you don’t go into something like this expecting Rob Roy, do you?

Taken 2 (2012); written by Luc Besson; directed by Olivier Megaton; starring Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace, Famke Jensson, and Rade Šerbedžija. 

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